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my first polishing attempt


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#1 Jgspahn

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Posted 04 March 2013 - 11:37 AM

Well after reading through old topics and hitting some folks up on the messenger here, I attempted to try to learn this polishing stuff. It turned out ok, but not good enough. My process was wet sanding from 320 all the way to 2000, then using an air powered dye grinder with a cotton polishing with brown followed by white compound. I can't seen to get that last bit of haze to go away tho :(.. Does anybody have any tips for that, and also, how do you "seal" it after you finish, because it scratches super easy now.. Thanks guys

Before

IMG_20130223_174353_691.jpg

After


IMG_20130225_185833_716.jpg

#2 fappy'97

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Posted 04 March 2013 - 12:04 PM

Best way to seal it is to powdercoat it clear. It will dull just a little bit, being a clear coat, though.

#3 Jgspahn

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Posted 04 March 2013 - 12:35 PM

What about some rattle can clear coat? I would think it would be to smooth for that tho.

#4 Jgspahn

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Posted 04 March 2013 - 12:38 PM

I was also thinking about doing my t5s.....

#5 Jgspahn

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Posted 05 March 2013 - 12:28 PM

Anybody know how to seal or protect it? Or any secrets about that last bit of haze? Or maybe some that looks like hammered asshole comments??? Lol

#6 fastbanshee8

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Posted 05 March 2013 - 12:39 PM

Clean the buffing pad, so it doesn't have a lot of compound on it, and that haze will go away.  The buffing pad has to have a bit of compound on it, but not a lot.



#7 Jgspahn

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Posted 05 March 2013 - 01:47 PM

How do you Clean it?

#8 troyzstang

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Posted 05 March 2013 - 04:51 PM

How do you Clean it?

I just use a blade from a hacksaw. Fire up the wheel and run the teeth across it. Takes the build up off and your good to go.

 

Gotta warn ya though. Polishing is a pain in the ass. There is no secret or magic trick. Just time consuming & tedious work .

 

Troy


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#9 vulvafan537240

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Posted 05 March 2013 - 05:44 PM

Start over. Bench buffer with brown tripoli and tight spiral wheel, then white with loose cotton wheel.

Eastwood has some sealer that's supposed to be really good stuff. Never used it though.
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#10 Jgspahn

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Posted 06 March 2013 - 12:01 AM

Well I'm an ole boring engineer, so tedious isn't that bad lol and as long as I can get it to come out looking good it will be worth it. I was looking into just buying a bench grinder from harbor freight. They are 3/4 HP. Would that be powerful enough?

#11 Jgspahn

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Posted 06 March 2013 - 12:06 AM

Start over. Bench buffer with brown tripoli and tight spiral wheel, then white with loose cotton wheel.

Eastwood has some sealer that's supposed to be really good stuff. Never used it though.


When you say start over.... Lets say I have some haze.. Is it part of the process to back up after white compound and use brown again and then back to white?

#12 vulvafan537240

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Posted 06 March 2013 - 12:07 AM

Get a bench buffer instead or maybe a combination grinder/buffer. It'll give you more room for big stuff. The smaller the motor, the slower it will turn when you apply pressure with the part.

#13 vulvafan537240

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Posted 06 March 2013 - 12:15 AM

Start with brown first but with a firm wheel. Then use a loose wheel and white.

#14 Jgspahn

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Posted 06 March 2013 - 12:16 AM

Get a bench buffer instead or maybe a combination grinder/buffer. It'll give you more room for big stuff. The smaller the motor, the slower it will turn when you apply pressure with the part.


Will 3/4 HP suffice? If so, awesome.. If not, how big?

#15 vulvafan537240

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Posted 06 March 2013 - 12:18 AM

3/4 will work but go as big as you can afford. Really depends on how much you plan on polishing.